Мобильная версия

Доступно журналов:

2 361

Доступно статей:

3 493 662

 

Cambridge University Press по журналам "Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures"

Отсортировать по: Порядок: Результаты:

  • Holland R. F. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1977-03-01)
    The idea of absolute goodness and the idea of an absolute requitement tend nowadays to be viewed with suspicion in the world of English-speaking philosophy. The tendency is well rooted and has not just arisen by osmosis ...
  • Johnson Oliver (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    Of all the kinds of arguments that philosophers use to support their conclusions, the one type that I find personally to stick longest and most vividly in my mind is the verbal pictures they occasionally draw. Whether this ...
  • Kolnai Aurel (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1968-03-01)
    Moore in Ethics (1912), ch. vii, writes – if I understand him right – that our basic experience of free-will resides in our certain feeling, in regard to our past actions, that we could have acted differently if we had so ...
  • Phillips D. Z. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    It has been said that the tendency to make use of examples drawn from literature in discussing problems in moral philosophy is not only dangerous, but needless. Dangers there certainly are, but these have little to do with ...
  • Taylor D.M. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1975-03-01)
    What could an empirical theory of the Mind be? Surely one which demonstrated that questions about the existence of minds were empirical questions – to be decided by observation, by the senses. This in turn would require ...
  • Forge Andrew (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    Eighteenth-century country gentlemen would carry small amber-coloured reducing lenses on their evening walks, and with their help they would transport themselves from Derbyshire or Kent into the Roman campagna or into the ...
  • Drake Michael (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1970-03-01)
    In recent years the quest for the proper form and content of social science studies has been a major preoccupation of academics. The reasons for this are numerous: the very rapid expansion of higher education generally and ...
  • Passmore John (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1974-03-01)
    The ambiguity of the word ‘nature’ is so remarkable that I need not remark upon it. Except perhaps to emphasise that this ambiguity — scarcely less apparent, as Aristotle long ago pointed out, in its Greek near-equivalent ...
  • Brown S. C. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1971-03-01)
    That the legacy of Berkeley's philosophy has been a largely sceptical one is perhaps rather surprising. For he himself took it as one of his objectives to undermine scepticism. He roundly denied that there were ‘any ...
  • White R. M. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1973-03-01)
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus contains a wide range of profound insights into the nature of logic and language – insights which will survive the particular theories of the Tractatus and seem to me to mark definitive and ...
  • White Ian (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1978-03-01)
    From the time of its clearest origins with Pascal, the theory of probabilities seemed to offer means by which the study of human affairs might be reduced to the same kind of mathematical discipline that was already being ...
  • Hare Richard (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1974-03-01)
    In planning the conduct of his affairs in relation to nature, man is faced with many problems which are so complex and so intermeshed that it is hard to say at first even what kind of problems they are. We are all familiar ...
  • Brumfitt J. H. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1978-03-01)
    Principal editor of the great Encyclopedia, novelist and prose writer of genius, contributor to the development of scientific thought and method, to the theory of the bourgeois drama and to the practice of art criticism, ...
  • Clark Michael (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1969-03-01)
    While philosophers feel relatively comfortable about talking of the present and the past, some of them feel uncomfortable about talking in just the same way of future events. They feel that, in general, discourse about the ...
  • Hesse Mary (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1969-03-01)
    As in the case of great books in all branches of philosophy, Pierre Duhem's Le Théorie Physique, first published in 1906, can be looked to as the progenitor of many different and even conflicting currents in subsequent ...
  • Körner Stephan (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1975-03-01)
    The purpose of this essay is to exhibit certain crucial shortcomings of some representative empiricist and anti-empiricist ethical theories and to sketch an empiricist ethics which is not exposed to these objections and ...
  • Harris Errol E. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1975-03-01)
    The term ‘Empiricism’ has had at least two different, though not unconnected, applications in modern thought, one to scientific method and the other to philosophical theory. My intention in this lecture is to try to show ...
  • Bambrough Renford (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1974-03-01)
    I am grateful for the honour that is done to me by the invitation to give the first H. B. Acton Lecture. We are all grateful for an occasion to honour Professor Acton. It is disappointing, however understandable, and fitting ...
  • Wisdom John (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1968-03-01)
    I Fear you will be disappointed in what I have to say. For I am going to talk about those who, though they have said ‘There is a way to eternal life’, have then gone on to explain that what they mean does not imply that ...
  • Wollheim Richard (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1968-03-01)
    Whether the word ‘passion’, as indicating the suffering or affection from without of a soul, is by now no more than a dead metaphor, surviving from an antique conception of the mind; whether, indeed, there is any way open ...