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Cambridge University Press по журналам "Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures"

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  • Holland R. F. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1977-03-01)
    The idea of absolute goodness and the idea of an absolute requitement tend nowadays to be viewed with suspicion in the world of English-speaking philosophy. The tendency is well rooted and has not just arisen by osmosis ...
  • Raphael D. D. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1978-03-01)
    What darkness was the ‘Enlightenment’ supposed to have removed? The answer is irrational forms of religion. Most of the ‘enlightened’ took the view that revealed religion was irrational and that natural religion could be ...
  • Johnson Oliver (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    Of all the kinds of arguments that philosophers use to support their conclusions, the one type that I find personally to stick longest and most vividly in my mind is the verbal pictures they occasionally draw. Whether this ...
  • Kolnai Aurel (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1968-03-01)
    Moore in Ethics (1912), ch. vii, writes – if I understand him right – that our basic experience of free-will resides in our certain feeling, in regard to our past actions, that we could have acted differently if we had so ...
  • Vesey G. N. A. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1968-03-01)
    One of the theories defined in Baldwin's Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, published in 1901, is ‘The Double Aspect Theory’. It is ‘the theory of the relation of mind and body, which teaches that mental and bodily ...
  • Cherry Christopher (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1974-03-01)
    Fairly recently, I came upon the following passage in a review of a book by Colin M. Turnbull, called The Mountain People: A child dumped on the ground is seized and eaten by a leopard. The mother is delighted; for not ...
  • Phillips D. Z. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    It has been said that the tendency to make use of examples drawn from literature in discussing problems in moral philosophy is not only dangerous, but needless. Dangers there certainly are, but these have little to do with ...
  • Taylor D.M. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1975-03-01)
    What could an empirical theory of the Mind be? Surely one which demonstrated that questions about the existence of minds were empirical questions – to be decided by observation, by the senses. This in turn would require ...
  • Farrell B. A. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1969-03-01)
    I shall attempt something rash in this paper. I shall draw your attention to some past and current work on perception by psychologists and others. I shall concentrate on work in vision and hearing. This outline will occupy ...
  • Barrett Cyril (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    Some years ago I came across the following question thrown out almost casually in the course of discussion: How many of us, it was asked, want to call a ‘bad work of art’ a ‘work of art’? The question was clearly rhetorical; ...
  • Halmos Paul (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1970-03-01)
    The mass media of communications have often been charged with making our life more vulgar than need be. The assumption which underlies what I have to say is that the influence of unique artistic sensitivities on society ...
  • Forge Andrew (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1972-03-01)
    Eighteenth-century country gentlemen would carry small amber-coloured reducing lenses on their evening walks, and with their help they would transport themselves from Derbyshire or Kent into the Roman campagna or into the ...
  • Glover Jonathan (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1977-03-01)
    Sir, I have recently had occasion to give my support to a local demand by parents and teachers for a patrolled crossing over a busy road outside their children's school. I have been appalled at what I have learned. First, ...
  • Drake Michael (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1970-03-01)
    In recent years the quest for the proper form and content of social science studies has been a major preoccupation of academics. The reasons for this are numerous: the very rapid expansion of higher education generally and ...
  • Passmore John (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1974-03-01)
    The ambiguity of the word ‘nature’ is so remarkable that I need not remark upon it. Except perhaps to emphasise that this ambiguity — scarcely less apparent, as Aristotle long ago pointed out, in its Greek near-equivalent ...
  • Bell David R. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1970-03-01)
    Some things are pervasive and yet elusive. If it can be agreed that the concept of my title and its instances are of this kind, then the observation may serve to justify the present enterprise. The elusiveness of authority ...
  • Brown S. C. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1971-03-01)
    That the legacy of Berkeley's philosophy has been a largely sceptical one is perhaps rather surprising. For he himself took it as one of his objectives to undermine scepticism. He roundly denied that there were ‘any ...
  • Shiner Roger A. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1978-03-01)
    It is something of a commonplace of Butlerian interpretation that the main interest and achievements of Butler's moral philosophy are in normative ethics, and not metaethics. He wishes to bring moral enlightenment to ...
  • White R. M. (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1973-03-01)
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus contains a wide range of profound insights into the nature of logic and language – insights which will survive the particular theories of the Tractatus and seem to me to mark definitive and ...
  • White Ian (Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 1978-03-01)
    From the time of its clearest origins with Pascal, the theory of probabilities seemed to offer means by which the study of human affairs might be reduced to the same kind of mathematical discipline that was already being ...